Do public officials always know best?

Their track record shows quite the opposite

By Jim Clarkson
jclarkson@rsmenergy.com
Posted 3/29/21

Cynical as we are about government actions, they occasionally shock us. 

This shocker is from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 

This is the federal government’s …

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

Log in

Do public officials always know best?

Their track record shows quite the opposite

Posted

Cynical as we are about government actions, they occasionally shock us. 
This shocker is from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 
This is the federal government’s notoriously bad weather forecasting agency.
It posts scary headlines on its web site. 
Last winter's forecast was really off. 
Here's how the head of NOAA, Neil Jacobs, bragged about their accuracy: 
“NOAAs timely and accurate seasonal outlooks and short-term forecasts are the result of improved satellite observations, more detailed computer modeling and expanding supercomputing capacity.”
 So how did Neil and his sophisticated technology do? 
On October 15, 2020, we were told: “NOAA’s winter forecast favors warmer, drier conditions across the southern tier of the US and cooler. wetter conditions in the North.”
 You hear that Texas? 
The official government weather for you was a warmer winter. 
Fancy climate computer models wrong again. 
The Farmer’s Almanac wins.

Our vanishing beaches
 In 1995, the New York Times reported that government climate experts predicted East Coast beaches would be gone in 25 years.
The experts said:
• Beaches were already disappearing at the rate of 2 to 3 feet a year. 
• All Florida coastal cities would be submerged and large parts of New York would be under water. 
• Thousands would be  displaced.
 Well, the 25-year prediction is not just wrong but very wrong. 
Coastal population is up 25% and property values are also up. 
Climate hypocrites like Al Gore own beach houses. They didn't believe the experts.
 
Politics of Natural Gas
Price fluctuations, supply shortages and monopoly abuse are a direct result of federal and state regulation.  
Reduced natural gas prices, supply increases and improved service come with competition.
The struggle between regulation and the market continue.  
Customers receive false price signals.
Businesses shift to less regulated areas.
Regulated prices grow over market prices.  
The long history of government failure versus market success should convince pragmatists to join free market advocates working to liberate the natural gas business.
 For Mr. Clarkson's newsletter, write him at 
jclarkson@rsmenergy.com 

Special offer for you
If you like our Chronicle stories, you can help us.
Please join our loyal subscriber family.
To help us keep serving you, we have a  special offer:
A 3-month digital subscription for only $10.
This offer is also good for present subscibers who want to add 3 months to their subscription.

weather, forecasts, beaches, Al Gore, politics, natural, gas, prices

Comments

No comments on this item Please log in to comment by clicking here