What are your precious memories?

We invite you to share a memory with other readers

Posted 5/21/21

A Chronicle reader calls occasionally to let us know he’s still with us.

“I’ve survived Alzheimer’s for 22 years,” he said in a call the other day.

The best thing about Alzheimer’s, …

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

Log in

What are your precious memories?

We invite you to share a memory with other readers

Posted

A Chronicle reader calls occasionally to let us know he’s still with us.
“I’ve survived Alzheimer’s for 22 years,” he said in a call the other day.
The best thing about Alzheimer’s, he said, is that you can’t recall what you had for breakfast – or if you even had breakfast – but you could recall precious memories from 50 or 60 years ago.
He shared a few of his memories.
His 1st newspaper byline was a thrill. He had written an account of his adventures at 4-H camp that the Manning Times published on its front page with his bylines
His 1st paying job, he said, was at age 10 selling Clovertine ointment door to door for 25 cents a can. He got to keep 50% of the money in commissions.
When you sold enough ointment, Clovertine rewarded you with a photo of a puppy.
You were happy to receive the photo and Mom didn’t have to nag you to feed, walk and clean up after a real puppy.
Such shared memories trigger our own precious memories. You are probably thinking of a few from your childhood.
I’ll admit I don’t remember my 1st byline but I fondly remember the interview that won me my 1st paying newspaper job.
Fresh out of the US Army and at my father’s suggestion, I went to see Carl Wymer, the Greenville News managing editor.  
Mr. Wymer was an elderly gent, near retirement age. He was the only newspaper editor I ever worked for who wore a green eyeshade and clear plastic cuffs to protect his shirt cuffs from printer’s ink.
He asked me what experience I had and what kind of job was I looking for.
I admitted only high school and college newspapers and wanted to be a reporter.
Had I done any editing? No, I admitted.
What had I majored in? English.
“I don’t need any reporters,” he said.
My hopes crashed.
“I do need a copy editor. You know what copy editors do?”
No, I admitted but I was eager to learn.
“I’ll tell you what,” he said. “We have a graduate student from Carolina coming in tomorrow about the job. If we don’t hire him, I’ll give you a tryout.”
My father asked that evening how it went with Mr. Wymer. I told him he was going to hire a guy with a masters degree.
Surprisingly, Mr. Wymer called.
“You still want the copy editing job?”
“Oh, yes, sir,” I said.
“Can you be at work at 4 this afternoon?”
“Yes, sir. You can count on me.”
“Any questions?”
“Yes, sir. What happened about the guy from Carolina with the masters degree?”
“Oh, he decided he was too good for us.”
The Carolina graduate school is responsible for my 1st paying editing job.
Our friend who called the other day said he had an idea for us. What if we invited Chronicle readers to share precious memories with other readers?
What do you think? A memory of about 250 words or less? You can send them to me at JerryBellune@yahoo.com
 Next: Beat the odds

A gift suggestion
Do you know someone trying to find their way in life? Give them Jerry Bellune’s inspiring e-book, “Your Life’s Great Purpose.” 
It’s been updated with new stories and a bonus chapter. It’s available for $9.99 on Amazon at https://www.amazon.com/Lifes-Great-Purpose-Jerry-Bellune-ebook
 

Alzheimer’s, Carl, Wymer, Greenville, news, memories

Comments

No comments on this item Please log in to comment by clicking here